Consumer Electronics Show (CES): Why what happens in Vegas doesn’t always stay in Vegas

The date is June 25th 1967. Outside the walls of New York’s Americana and Hilton Hotels, it might be the Summer of Love but here, a different kind of revolution is going on. 17,500 attendees and over 100 exhibitors have come from across America and beyond to take part in the first ever Consumer Electronics Show (CES).

There had been events showcasing consumer electronic before, of course. The Chicago Music Show, for example. But this was the first time the industry had had a show of its own. At CES 1967, exhibitors demonstrated cutting-edge technologies that they hoped would become the must-have consumer items of tomorrow. But did the show itself have a future?

Cut forward to the present day and the answer is a resounding yes. Now held in Las Vegas, the show has been running for nearly 50 years. And although it’s had its share of failures, such as 1974’s Laserdisc player, it’s also been the Launchpad for many technologies we take for granted in our everyday lives. VCR (1970), Camcorders, CD Players (1981) and DVDs (1996) all made their debut at CES.

So what does the future hold, according to this year’s CES? Firstly, more internet connected devices. The Internet of Things is a concept that seems to be gaining traction with intelligent internet-connected central heating, security cameras, and fridges all on the horizon. Want to see if you’re out of milk before you drive all the way home? Use your phone to connect to the fridge. Gone to bed and forgot to turn the heating off but can’t be bothered to get up? There’s an app for that!

Curved monitors and Virtual Reality displays that show 3D content and allow you to manipulate it via a stylus made their debut. Smart socks, voice-controlled watches, and wearable cameras that take photos for you may sound crazy but hey, the wheel probably sounded nuts once upon a time too, right?  As with all trade shows, some products at CES 2015 will no doubt take off while others fade away.

So, can we predict anything from CES 2015? I think so. While individual hits and misses may only become clear in hindsight, there does seem to be a trend towards connecting more and more devices to each other and the internet. While potentially exciting, this interconnectivity will also, no doubt, come with its own set of security issues for customers to grapple with. It can be a nightmare if your computer breaks down, is hacked, or contracts a virus, without having to worry about whether the problem will spread to your kettle or worse, your socks.

While that dark future is yet to pass, it’s always worth making sure the tech in your life is operating to the best of its ability. Computopia Bespoke Systems can help will a full PC Health Check to keep your computer running smoothly and remove nasty viruses and spyware. To find out more about this, and our other services, visit http://computopiasystems.com/index.htm.

Euan Mumford

 

Sources:

 http://www.cesweb.org/home – The official website of CES

http://www.twice.com/news/news/1967-first-ces-goes-broadway-june-1967/29721 – Article on the first ever CES

http://www.pcgamer.com/hp-unveils-4k-5k-curved-display-and-virtual-reality-monitors/ – PC gamer article on curved displays and VR monitors

Gameover Zeus / Cryptolocker cybercrime botnet

You may have heard on the news yesterday, or today, that there are a couple of really nasty computer attacks doing the rounds, namely ‘Gameover Zeus’ and ‘Cryptolocker’.

Gameover Zeus is an advanced financial fraud Trojan and is typically distributed through an email which poses as an invoice. Once an infected user visits their banking website through a compromised computer, Gameover intercepts their online session using a technique commonly known as man-in-the browser (MITB). It displays fraudulent banking security messages to the user to obtain information for transaction authorization. As soon as the attackers get these details, they can modify the users’ banking transactions and steal their money.

Cryptolocker is one of the most dangerous variants of ransomware in circulation, since it employs strong encryption that cannot be broken. The threat first appeared in September 2013 and, while it still only comprises a small percentage of overall ransomware infections, it has captured public attention because victims who don’t have their files backed up are liable to lose them unless they pay the ransom.

Ransomware, including Cryptolocker, has proven to be exceptionally lucrative for attackers. Research indicates that on average, 3 percent of infected users will pay the ransom. It is believed that ransomware distributors have without doubt earned tens of millions of dollars over the past year.

Victims are usually infected by spam emails which use social engineering tactics to try and entice opening of an attached zip file.

If victims opens the attachment, they will launch an executable file disguised to look like an invoice report or some other similar document, depending on the email theme. This executable file will download Trojan.Zbot, aka Zeus. Once infected with Zeus, the infected computer also downloads Trojan Cryptolocker onto the system. Cryptolocker then contacts a command and control server (C&C), which is controlled by the attackers. Once a C&C is found, Cryptolocker will download the public key that is used to encrypt the files on to the infected computer. The linked private key, which is required for decrypting the files, remains on the C&C server, i.e. with the attackers.

What you can do to safeguard your computer

  • Install internet security software
  • Do not open attachments in emails unless you are 100% certain that they are authentic
  • Make sure your internet security software is up-to-date and switched on at all times
  • Make sure your Windows operating system has the latest Microsoft updates applied
  • Make sure your software programs have the latest manufacturers’ updates applied
  • Make sure all of your files including documents, photos, music and bookmarks are backed up and readily available in case you are no longer able to access them on your computer
  • Never store passwords on your computer in case they are accessed by Gameover Zeus or another aggressive malware program

The FBI, together with the UK’s National Crime Agency (NCA), have pu a temporary block on these attacks, but they stressed that people probably had “two weeks” before the criminals would get the botnet functioning again.

If you need advice regarding Internet Security or your computer isn’t protected then please call Terry or Iain at Computopia on 01702 219143.

Heart Bleed Update – What You Should Know

What is Heartbleed?

Heartbleed is a bug in the  software code running on the servers of millions of websites. It leaves open a hole that allows  computer hackers bypass the encryption between you and the site. This means that the information stored on the servers, and passed between you, could be stolen. It is also impossible to know to what damage has been done and to what extent.

Is this strictly a threat that is only on the Internet?

Just the Internet: Sites running OpenSSL. encryption.

Is Heartbleed a virus?

Not exactly. It is a hole that could leave websites and user information exposed to attack and or theft of stored data.

Why wasn’t it discovered until now?

The code error was small. It was not an attack; it was simply some bad code written by the people who built OpenSSL. It sounds like more of an accident.

Has a list of the major sites using OpenSSL been compiled? YES.

This page link which is totally safe takes you to the list of sites which are/were at risk and what their response was.

click here for the list of sites potentially affected.  Some of these sites will be used by you every day.

WHAT ACTION SHOULD YOU TAKE TO PROTECT YOU FROM HEART BLEED.

When should we change our passwords?

Changing passwords right now might be a pointless exercise. The sites you visit could still have the vulnerability and your new password could be stolen.

If I’m running my own website, how do I protect it?

If you run OpenSSL, update it as soon as possible. We can help should you require advice.

Has it affected most firewalls?

It’s not really a firewall attack. If the vulnerability exists (on a site or service), the communication between you and it is open to compromise.

If you have any further questions please contact us direct on 01702 219143

 Thanks for taking the time to read this article.

Terry Mumford

Information provided by Cambridge Laptop Repair

Excel 2013: Creating and managing drop down lists

You can make a worksheet more efficient by providing drop-down lists. Someone using your worksheet clicks an arrow, and then clicks an entry in the list.

Download the entire course from here

1. Creating Drop Down Lists:

Data entry is quicker and more accurate when you use a drop-down list to limit the entries people can make in a cell. When someone selects a cell, the drop-down list’s down-arrow appears, and they can click it and make a selection.

dropdownlist2. Drop Down List Settings:

You can use a comma-delimited list, a cell range, or a named range to define the options in a drop-down list. This video focuses on how to use a cell range and named range.

3. Input & Error Messages:

To help people decide what drop-down list option to select, and even to let them know that a cell contains a drop-down list, you can create a message that appears when they select a cell. Or that shows an error message when a drop-down list option isn’t selected properly.

4. Manage Drop Down Lists:

To prevent changes to your drop-down list data, you can hide the columns, rows, or the entire worksheet that contains the data. And unhide them if you need to make changes. You can also lock and password protect the cells on the worksheet or even the entire worksheet.

Thanks for taking the time to read this article.

Terry Mumford

Manage messages by using rules – Outlook 2007

If you have a load of messages in your Inbox and you’re overwhelmed by the task of organising it then this article is for you. This article explains what rules are and how you can use rules to stay organised and current with the activity in your Inbox.

How rules help you manage messages

A rule is an action that Microsoft Outlook takes automatically on an arriving or sent message that meets the conditions that you specify in the rule. You can choose many conditions and actions by using the Rules and Alerts Wizard. Rules do not operate on message that have been read, only on those that are unread.

Rules fall into one of two general categories: organisation and notification. The Rules and Alerts Wizard contains templates for the most commonly used rules.

  • Stay organized    These are rules that help you to file and follow up on messages. For example, you can create a rule for messages from a specific sender, such as Bobby Moore, with the word “sales” in the Subject line, to be flagged for follow-up, categorised as Sales, and moved to a folder called Bobby’s Sales.
  • Stay up-to-date    These are rules that notify you in some way when you receive a particular message. For example, you can create a rule that automatically sends an alert to your mobile telephone when you receive a message from a family member.
  • Start from a blank rule    These are rules that you create from scratch.

Rule templates

Fig. 1  The Rules and Alerts Wizard contains several predefined rules, called templates.

Exceptions

You can add exceptions to your rules for special circumstances, such as when a message is flagged for follow-up action or is marked with high importance. A rule is not applied to a message if even one of the exceptions that you specify is met.

Create a rule from a template

  1. In the Navigation Pane (Navigation Pane: The column on the left side of the Outlook window that includes buttons for the Mail, Calendar, and Tasks views and the folders within each view. Click a folder to show the items in the folder.), click Mail.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Rules and Alerts.
  3. If you have more than one e-mail account, in the Apply changes to this folder list, select the Inbox that you want.
  4. Click New Rule.
  5. Under Step 1: Select a template, select the template that you want from the Stay Organized or Stay Up to Date collection of templates.
  6. Under Step 2: Edit the rule description, click an underlined value. For example, if you click the people or distribution list link, the Address Book opens.
  7. Under Step 1: Select condition(s), select the conditions that you want the messages to meet for the rule to apply.
  8. Under Step 2: Edit the rule description, click an underlined value if you have not done so already, and then click Next.
  9. Under Step 1: Select action(s), select the action that you want the rule to take when the specified conditions are met.
  10. Under Step 2: Edit the rule description, click an underlined value if you have not done so already, and then click Next.
  11. Under Step 1: Select exception(s), select any exceptions to the rule, and then click Next.
  12. To finish creating the rule, enter a name for the rule, and then select any other options that you want.
    • If you want to run this rule on messages that already are in one of your folders, select the Run this rule now on messages already in “folder check box.
    • To apply this rule to all your e-mail accounts and the Inbox associated with each account, select the Create this rule on all accounts check box.
  13. Click Finish.

Create a rule from scratch

To create a rule by choosing your own conditions, actions, and exceptions, do the following:

  1. In the Navigation Pane (Navigation Pane: The column on the left side of the Outlook window that includes buttons for the Mail, Calendar, and Tasks views and the folders within each view. Click a folder to show the items in the folder.), click Mail.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Rules and Alerts.
  3. If you have more than one e-mail account, in the Apply changes to this folder list, select the Inbox that you want.
  4. Click New Rule.
  5. Under Start from a blank rule, select either Check messages when they arrive or Check messages after sending, and then click Next.
  6. Under Step 1: Select condition(s), select the conditions that you want the messages to meet for the rule to apply.
  7. Under Step 2: Edit the rule description, click an underlined value if you have not done so already, and then click Next.
  8. Under Step 1: Select action(s), select the action that you want the rule to take when the specified conditions are met.
  9. Under Step 2: Edit the rule description, click an underlined value if you have not done so already, and then click Next.
  10. Under Step 1: Select exception(s), select any exceptions to the rule, and then click Next.
  11. To finish creating the rule, enter a name for the rule, and then select any other options that you want.
    • If you want to run this rule on messages that already are in one of your folders, select the Run this rule now on messages already in “folder check box.
    • To apply this rule to all your e-mail accounts and the Inbox associated with each account, select the Create this rule on all accounts check box.
  12. Click Finish.

Create a rule from a message

You can create a rule directly from a message. For example, you can create a rule to move messages from someone to a specific folder.

  1. Right-click the message that you want to base the rule on, and then click Create Rule on the shortcut menu.

In the Create Rule dialog box, select the check boxes for the options that are already filled in with information from your selected message.

  1. Select the Move the item to folder check box.
  2. Click an existing folder or click New to create a new folder to store the messages.
  3. To add more conditions, actions, or exceptions to the rule, click Advanced Options, and then follow the rest of the instructions in the Rules and Alerts Wizard.

Tip     To run the rule as soon as you create it, select the Run this rule now on the messages already in folder check box on the last page of the Rules and Alerts Wizard.

All the messages in your Inbox, or any folder that you choose, that meet the conditions and exceptions associated with the rule are moved to the specified folder. To test your new rule, open your new folder. Were the correct messages moved?

Run a rule periodically but not all the time

If you want to run a rule periodically but not all the time, do the following:

  1. On the Tools menu, click Rules and Alerts.
  2. In the Rules and Alerts dialog box, turn the rule off by clearing the check box next to the rule.
  3. Click Run Rules Now.
  4. In the Run Rules Now dialog box, under Select rules to run, select the check box next to the rule that you want to run.
  5. Select the folder that you want to apply the rule to.
  6. Select the category of messages that you want to apply the rule to.

For example, you can apply the rule only to unread messages in a folder.

  1. Click Run Now.

Server-based rules and client-only rules

Server-based rules    If you have a Microsoft Exchange account, the server can apply rules to your messages even if Outlook is not running. These are called server-based rules. The rules must be set to be applied to messages when they are delivered to your Inbox on the server, and the rules must be able to run to completion on the server. For example, a rule cannot run to completion on the server if the action specifies that a message be printed. If a rule cannot be applied on the server, it is applied when you start Outlook.

Client-only rules    A “client” is the e-mail program that runs on an individual’s computer. A rule that cannot be applied by the server is a “client-only rule” because it runs only on the individual’s computer. If your list of rules contains rules that can be run on the server as well as those that cannot, the server-based rules are applied first, followed by the client-only rules.

Delivery receipts, voting responses, and out-of-office notices

In Outlook an item is the basic element that holds information – similar to a file in other programs. Items include e-mail messages, appointments, contacts, tasks, journal entries, notes, posted items, and documents.

Delivery receipts, read receipts, voting responses, and out-of-office notices are treated as messages. For example, when you create a rule that moves items with the word “meeting” in the Subject box to a specific folder, all delivery receipts, voting responses, and out-of-office messages that meet this condition are moved as well.

 Note   If a voting response is moved out of the Inbox, the response is not automatically tracked in the original message.

Meeting requests, task requests, and documents

Meeting requests, task requests, and documents are treated as messages. For example, when you create a rule that moves items with the word “meeting” in the Subject box to a specific folder, any task request or meeting request that meets that condition is moved as well. However, keep in mind the following limitations when you create rules that affect these types of items:

  • An item moved to a nonmail folder might not work as you expect after it is moved. For example, if a message is moved to the Calendar folder, a new appointment is not created.
  • If a meeting or task response is moved to the Deleted Items folder by using a rule, the response is not tracked by the original item.
  • If a meeting request is automatically moved to the Deleted Items folder, the meeting is not added to the Calendar.
  • Rules that affect messages that you send are not applied to task requests and meeting requests.

Distribution lists

A new rule for a distribution list will behave differently depending on how you create the rule:

  • Move messages sent to a distribution list to a folder    If you choose this rule template, only messages that are sent to the distribution list are moved to the specified folder. Messages from individuals who happen to be on the distribution list will not be moved to the specified folder.

 Note   This rule works only for Exchange accounts.

  • Move messages from someone to a folder    If you choose this rule template, messages from any individuals who are members of the distribution list that you specify are also moved to the specified folder.

Forwarding messages outside your organization

If you work in an organization that uses Exchange, by default, messages you forward to external e-mail addresses outside your organization using a rule will not be sent. This setting is to help prevent corporate data from being disclosed and is controlled by your Exchange administrator.

 

Help! My website is compromised

You may have noticed that our blog, in fact our entire website, has been unavailable due to malicious content. Well we’re back and I thought it a good idea to let you know what to do should you find yourself in the same position.

Luckily our site is used for marketing our business and providing information for computer users – we do not have an e-commerce site otherwise the business would have really suffered.

I first became aware of the problem when I tried to visit our site via Google Chrome and I got a warning page saying that my website had been compromised. This was quickly followed by an email from my hosting company saying the same thing (nice to know that they were on the ball).

The first thing to do is to troubleshoot the problem using Google Webmaster Tools, where it will list the problem(s) that have been detected. In our case someone had loaded a bogus webpage (redir.php) which redirected our visitors to a site containing malware. The Tool also tells you if the malware has had an effect on any other sites.

The next step is to get rid of the bogus page(s). I have a (clean) copy of our website on a local computer and so took the following steps:

  1. Delete all folders and files from the web server using FTP client program (Filezilla is good)
  2. Check your local site for viruses or malware using your standard programs (AVG CloudCare and MalwareBytes in my case)
  3. Upload the local site to the web server via FTP

When you are confident that the site is OK you will have to notify Google of the steps you have taken to clean the site and ask them to review the site. Follow this link for the Google guidelines on Cleaning Your Site.

Assuming that you followed their guidelines and can provide proof of the steps that you took, your site will be up and running again within 1 – 2 hours.

Finally change the passwords for your website – changing the admin, FTP & blog passwords should be sufficient.

Thanks for taking the time to read this article.

Terry Mumford

Google Earth Keeps Crashing

We recently had a query from one of our customers who said that all of a sudden Google Earth keeps crashing. Not ideal if you’re dependent on Google Earth for research, planning hiking trips by using GPS, or simply getting directions and locations of places of interest.

Apparently Google Earth had been running fine on his PC, but for some reason, when he clicked on it, the PC crashed. If you have Google update automatically running on your PC then it is likely that a program update has been installed and that this update has changed the graphics driver settings.

Google Earth can run in two different graphics modes: DirectX and OpenGL. Both DirectX and OpenGL are known as Application Programming Interfaces (API). There are many types of APIs that can be used in applications. The specific APIs in this case are used to control 2D and 3D graphics. DirectX is Microsoft’s version, and OpenGL is a version that is “Open” software.

Here’s how you can get round the problem:

Go to the “Start Programs” button, then select “All Programs” and navigate to the “Google Earth” folder. Under this folder, you will see two options for running the program (see the screenshot below). The two options are:
– Start Google Earth in DirectX mode
– Start Google Earth in OpenGL mode

googleearth

 

 

 

 

 

Click on one of these selections when starting your Google Earth program. As with all things Microsoft, it is more likely that their version (DirectX) is the culprit, so try selecting OpenGL mode. When you click on this selection, Google Earth should pop up a message that says ‘OpenGL will be used automatically from this point forward’. If so, you’re in luck

Thanks for taking the time to read this article.

Terry Mumford

Window 8 Upgrade

Last weekend I upgraded my office computer to Windows 8 Pro from Windows 7 Pro. The first step I took was to back up my current system by using Windows Backup to create a system image on an external drive. I also had some old XP applications running under Windows 7 XP Mode and so I backed up the Virtual Hard Drive (vhd) as well.

The Windows 8 upgrade installed successfully with all of my settings transferred across to the new operating system. The installation took about an hour in all but on first glance I was pleased that my Desktop was identical to the Windows 7 version and all of the on-board devices were installed correctly.

Once I had installed my wireless USB adapter & USB printer I was up and running. Or so I thought!

Unfortunately there is no indication during the install that some of the Windows 7 Pro services are no longer supported under Windows 8 Pro, namely XP Mode and Windows Media Center. While I find Windows Media Center great for music and picture slideshows I feel I can live without it (more about this later). However, I keep all of my business accounts under XP Mode and was distraught that I could not access them.

Windows 8 Pro has the Hyper-V (virtualisation) feature which is the equivalent of XP Mode under Windows 7. However, Hyper-V is hardware dependent. The requirements are that your CPU must be 64-bit with virtualisation feature present and you must have Windows 8 Pro 64-bit edition with at least 4Gb RAM.

My computer does not meet these requirements so I cannot use the Hyper-V feature. As with all things with computing, there is usually more than one way to skin a cat!

I have come across a product called VMLite XP Mode – click here to download VMLiteWorkstationSetup.exe

VMLite XP Mode uses 256Mb RAM by default but you can adjust the settings to increase this to 512Mb (recommended).

Download and install VMLite XP Mode and follow the instructions to import your Windows XP Mode installation. Once you’ve done this, you will have a working Windows XP Mode installation running in VMLite on Windows 8 Pro.

By default, the VMLite XP Mode installation will import the base XP Mode .vhd file, so you’ll get a fresh install of XP Mode missing anything you installed or configured under XP Mode yourself.

To bring back all the changes and settings you may have made, you’ll need to shut down the VMLite XP Mode virtual PC and change its settings so it will use your differencing VHD file instead of the clean one imported by default.

Once the XP Mode virtual PC has been shut down, select Virtual Media Manager from the File menu. Now click on Add and navigate to “C:\Program Files\Windows XP Mode”. “Select Windows XP Mode base.vhd” to add it to the media library.

Now click Add again and navigate to “C:\Users\[your username]\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows Virtual PC\Virtual Machines\”. Add your differencing VHD file to the media library. You should see the Windows XP Mode base vhd with the differencing Windows XP Mode vhd connected as a child. Click OK to leave the Virtual Media Manager.

Now Click the settings icon in VMLite Workstation and go to Storage. Remove any existing virtual disk attached to the XP Mode PC and add your differencing VHD file from the Virtual Media Manager.

Now start up the VMLite XP Mode virtual PC and you should find all your changes installed. If you are asked to manually sign in to the Virtual PC, the default username should be “XPMuser” and the password would be the same as used under Windows 7.

As for Windows Media Center, Microsoft have decided that this application is an additional feature and they will charge £6.99 for it. (Yeah, I know!)

  1. Point to the upper-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.
  2. Enter add features in the search box, and then tap or click Settings .
  3. Tap or click Add features to Windows 8 and then do one of the following:
    • If you need to purchase a product key, tap or click I want to buy a product key online.Follow the steps to purchase and enter a product key.
    • If you already have a product key, tap or click I already have a product key.NOTE: This is not the Windows 8 Licence key.
  4. Enter your product key and click Next.
  5. Read the license terms, select the check box to accept the license terms, and then click Add features.

If you were running Windows 8, your PC will restart automatically and Windows 8 Pro With Media Center will be available for use.

If you were running Windows 8 Pro, your PC will restart automatically and Windows Media Center will be available for use.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this post.

Terry Mumford

Add Sounds, Movies And Animations To Your Powerpoint 2007 Presentation

Get started

First, open a presentation you’ve been working on, or create a new one. Then, move to the slide where you would like to add movies or sound.

To insert a movie (an animated picture) from Clip Organizer:

  1. On the Insert tab in the Media Clips group, click Movie, and then click Movie from Clip Organizer.
  2. Scroll through the list, or type keywords in Search for, and then click Go.

P-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • To preview a clip, point to a thumbnail, and click the arrow that appears. Then, click Preview/Properties
  • To insert the movie into the slide, click the thumbnail.
  • Drag the image or use the resize handles on the border to move or resize it.
  • Run the slide show to see how the movie looks.

To insert a sound (.wav or .mid file) from Clip Organizer:

  1. On the Insert tab in the Media Clips group, click Sound, and then click Sound from Clip Organizer.
  2. Scroll through the list, or type keywords in Search for, and then click Go.
  3. To preview a sound, point to a clip and click the arrow that appears. Then, click Preview/Properties.
  4. To insert the sound into the slide, click the thumbnail.
  5. Choose when you want the sound to play:

To insert a sound (.wav or .mid file) from Clip Organizer:

  1. Automatically. The sound plays automatically when you show the slide.
  2. When Clicked. The sound plays during the presentation when you click the sound icon.
  3. Move or resize the sound icon just as you would a picture.
  4. Select the icon, and click the Sound Tools Options tab for more options.

For example, if your sound runs automatically, you can click Hide During Show in the Sound Options group to hide the icon. Click Slide Show Volume, if you want to lower the volume of the sound to play in the background.

P-2

To insert a movie file:

  1. On the Insert tab in the Media Clips group, click Movie, and then click Movie from File.
  2. Locate the file using the Insert Movie dialog box.
  3. Choose when you want the movie file to play:
    1. Automatically. The movie plays automatically when you show the slide.
    2. When Clicked. The movie plays during the presentation when you click the icon.
    3. Move or resize the movie thumbnail just as you would a picture.
    4. Select the icon, and click the Movie Tools Options tab for more options.

To record your voice and add it to a slide:

P-3

 

 

 

 


NOTE
: To record your voice, you need to have a microphone connected to your computer.

  1. On the Insert tab in the Media Clips group, click Record Sound.
  2. Type a name for the recording, or use the default name.
  3. To begin, click the Record button.
  4. When you are finished, click the Stop button.
  5. To listen to the recording, click the Play button. Click the Record button again to add more sound to the recording, or click Cancel to start over at step 1. If you like the recording, click OK.
  6. A sound icon appears on your slide. You can move or resize the sound icon just as you would a picture. Select the icon, and click the Sound Tools Options tab for more options. While working on your presentation, you can hear the recording at any time by double-clicking the sound icon.

To control a music CD during a slide show:

  1. Place a music CD in your CD drive. If the CD starts playing, close the media player program.
  2. Copy the track to your computer for use in Step 3.
  3. In Office PowerPoint 2007, on the Insert tab in the Media Clips group, click Sound from File. Navigate to the file save in Step 2, select the file & click Open.
  4. Choose when you want the sound to play:
    1. Automatically. The track plays automatically when you show the slide.
    2. When Clicked. The track plays during the presentation when you click the icon.

Block Online Porn

The Daily Mail is currently calling upon the government to introduce a block on access to all porn websites. This would put the onus on adults having to ‘opt in’ to allow x-rated content for their own use.

The Daily Mail found that over half of the parents that they surveyed agreed with a complete block of online porn for minors. Even so, the government have ignored their pleas and instead will be petitioning the Internet Service Providers to prompt adults to turn on porn-blocking filters (‘opt-out’ option).

This is all well and good but a lot of parents do not have the time to supervise their children’s Internet usage. Even if they could the tech-savvy children can often find a way around the parental limitations.

Studies have found that teenage relationships have become more violent because of the easy access to sexual content by youngsters. Worryingly, the study found that young girls are being asked by their boyfriends to re-enact the images that they see on these sexually explicit sites.

In my opinion, I would like to see an opt-in policy that also includes a rating system the same as the movie industry, i.e. G, PG, PG-13, R & NC-17, thereby reducing any confusion as to what content children can view on the Internet.

What do you think? Should adults be asked to opt-in or opt-out of viewing porn websites?

Is it the responsibility of the parents or of government to introduce these controls?

If you are a parent who is worried that their children may be accessing porn sites, or you sense that they may have joined a chat room and are in danger of getting bullied or abused, then we recommend that you start using 3rd-party software to introduce parental controls, instead of setting arbitrary filters within your web browser.

Computopia recommends AVG Family Safety:

  • Safeguards against bullying and cyber-predators
  • Blocks inappropriate sites
  • Protects while searching and social networking
  • Password protected so that the settings cannot be changed unless you know the password

You get protection for up to 3 children per household, from £25.00 / year.

If you want to find out more about AVG Family Safety please call us on 01702 219143

Thank you for taking the time to read this article.

Terry Mumford